Confessions of an avocado addict

Avocado millennials

(Curse you avocado. The downfall of millennials everywhere.)

So a while ago I read an article about a millionaire who had said that the reason that millennials were struggling to buy houses was because they insisted on going to brunch every weekend to eat their ‘smashed avocado on toast.’

‘Rubbish’, I thought, as I had another bite of my mashed (which is totally different to ‘smashed’) avocado on Waitrose olive bread.

No seriously – that’s actually what I was eating.

There were a number of things about this statement which irritated me. Firstly the assumption that the reason this generation is struggling to buy houses is not because the housing market has rocketed to such insane levels that wages simply can’t keep up with. Nor perhaps that previous generations had significantly less tuition costs than this generation, whilst at the same time facing an increasing expectation from employers that you will have a degree. No, clearly it’s because the millennial generation are feckless spenders who like to waste their money enjoying life instead of socking away all their pennies under the mattress. THAT’S the problem.

‘Grrr,’ I thought. As did many others.

Now apparently I am a millennial. I don’t really know what that means, but I’m reliably informed that I am one. And this millennial decided many moons ago that she would like a house. So my partner and I made that our goal. We had no idea if or when we would reach it. But we worked really really f-ing hard, and saved everything, and sacrificed a ton of things with that goal in mind.

We definitely had some luck and help along the way (although I do believe you make your own luck to an extent) and we did eventually manage to buy our first house, in the South-East of England, when we were both still on tiny wages (him an apprentice and me in training for my current role). We were in our mid-twenties. This was way sooner than we’d ever dreamed of.

So now skip forward to a point several months after that article was published. I’d now decided to tackle our ever growing pile of house renovation debt, in an attempt to meet our new goal of debt-freeness. And you can imagine my irritation when I finally added up the cost of all those avocado breakfasts and realised that maybe – maybe – that bloody millionaire had actually had a point after all! Goddammit!

Turns out that the little things really do add up. While the amounts in question may seem so small as to be insignificant, actually it is those little costs, those treats, the ‘one-offs-which-are-actually-pretty-regular’ costs, that eat up all your spare cash. And that is extra cash that you could be adding to your savings or paying towards your debt.

So if you are truly committed to your financial goal, then yes – I’m afraid for now those lovely things may have to go. Sacrifice. It’s a necessary part of success.

So here we are. I still think that the ‘avocado issue’ trivialises the real uphill struggle faced by this generation in affording what the previous generation have managed fairly easily. But now at least I am saying that while eating my daily bowl of shreddies instead of avocado on toast. That is sacrifice, my friends.

Having said that – oh avocado, how I miss you! Shreddies are just not the same… Fear not, we will meet again. Just as soon as this millennial has cleared her debt.

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Credit cards: Friend or Foe?

I love my credit card

(“Whoop! I just looove my credit card, like, soooo much!!”)

Ok, before we start, I’m just going to say upfront that I do currently hold significant credit card debt. However, it was planned debt. We’re doing a house renovation and we always knew we would have to incur a certain level of debt to finish it. (We haven’t finished it – not even close, but that’s another story! Gah!)

So it wasn’t day to day spending that racked up the credit card debt. And we would have been scuppered without the ability to put a significant level of spending on them (yes, more than one). They’re all long, zero interest cards which we’re committed to clearing by the time any interest kicks in. It’s not ideal but we’re in control of it.

However, in the past I have definitely struggled with using a credit card responsibly. In fact, I’d always hated the idea of them.

I was brought up on the understanding that, if you can’t afford something, you don’t buy it. You wait and save, and then you buy it with cash that is yours – not borrowed. Only exception maybe being a house.

So I never even had a credit card for most of my life. I was offered one as part of my student account (which I think is despicable and wrong, by the way) but refused. I also resisted the interest free overdraft that came with the account. If I didn’t have the money, I just wouldn’t spend it. (The bank employee really struggled with this: “But, but – you’re a student! It’s interest FREE!” “Er, yeah. But it’s still debt, right?!”)

Credit card

(“Gurrrl, no! Credit cards are, like, sent, from heaven!” – This is what the banks want you to think.)

And all was well in my credit card free life. Until one fateful day when I booked a trip to Ireland and decided to hire a car for the first time.

Now I’m sure you’re all laughing at me for my naivety but it never occurred to me for a single second that a credit card might be necessary. Up until then, anything I’d needed, I’d whipped out the old debit card and paid right there and then.

Not so for a hire car company. Nope. Credit cards are queen and nothing else will do. I’m still not sure why. Presumably there’s an added level of protection that they have by taking your credit card details. Regardless – that’s what they want. And I didn’t have one.

Cue me going absolutely crazy, ringing pretty much every hire car company in Ireland trying to find one that would accept my poor little debit card. I did find one eventually but it cost me an absolute fortune. Like, hundreds more than it would have done otherwise. I was fuming but I didn’t have a choice.

So when I came home, I applied for a credit card. ‘Just for emergencies’, I said. I didn’t look for any great deals – I just got one with the bank I was already with. Wasn’t planning on using it, see?

Yeah. Great. Soooo… that didn’t go as planned. A couple of big expenses got put on there. Just one offs. Then petrol, and other bits and pieces when I was short of cash at the end of the month and didn’t want to go into my overdraft (yeah, I also had one of them too). I’d pay it off on payday, I told myself.

Except, payday would come and, well, if I cleared the whole card I’d just be in the same situation at the end of that month! So, it was minimum payments only (plus a little bit) and, voila. I was stuck in endless, ever so slightly increasing, credit card debt that I wasn’t making any real headway with. With a rubbish interest rate on top coz I wasn’t on a great deal.

It was all quite stressful and depressing. I mean, it wasn’t keeping me up at night but it did kinda hang over me constantly as something to worry about and I didn’t seem to quite have it in me to address it head on.

Embarrassingly, eventually my partner bailed me out. I wasn’t really being open with him either about it. I’d casually mention – ‘oh and of course I need to deal with the credit card etc.’ – but I wasn’t saying, ‘By the way babe, I’m a couple of thousand in debt and I’m not really making any headway with sorting it.’

Once I finally cracked and told him, he insisted on paying it off. This fundamentally goes against everything I believe in. I mean, we were living together and had bought a house together, so my money situation did impact him too. But I felt strongly that this was MY debt and not his responsibility. None the less, he paid it. I was incredibly grateful and also, weirdly, kinda resentful. Like HE was the one that was making me feel all guilty and crappy about the situation. Which of course is crap. It was all on me. He was just helping me out.

Anyway, it all sucked and I’ve worked hard to make sure I never got back into that situation. No careless spending on credit cards.

It was eye opening to me to find myself in that situation so easily. Especially as I thought I was fairly careful with money. Lesson learned.

Of course, credit cards do have their uses. As I said, we currently have a large (planned) credit card debt which is enabling us to sort out our house. We would struggle without that option being available. The difference is that I looked up the best rates and planned it all out, and now we’re paying them off, with the promise that no more debt is going on them. Because it is just too easy to lose control of it.

So if you’ve been there or are currently in this situation I feel you! I can only recommend facing up to it and making the commitment to sort it out, otherwise it’s not going to get any better. I know how lucky I was to have my partner help me.

Credit card

(Well she clearly still loves her credit card! 👍 How do you feel about yours?)